An “American” Brocante

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Yesterday I went “brocanting” back home in Atlanta. Scott’s Antique Market is an enormous antique/flea market held the second full weekend of every month in two very large warehouses, with additional brave sellers set up outside.  I say brave because in Atlanta it can be a sweltering 97 degrees outside, like it was yesterday, or at below freezing temps in the winter.  I once got a steal on a mahogany marble top table outside, but I suspect it was because it was the last day and the poor fella was dying from the heat and just wanted to go home.

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You will find lots of painted furniture, but you have to look inside to ensure that it’s a real piece from France vs. an American knock-off that has been painted and distressed to “look” old. At this price, this chest better have been authentic!

I have found numerous items there over the years, from furniture I currently have in my own home, to art to silver and lots of small objects. You can find everything there from authentic French antique furniture and mirrors, dishes from around the world, LOTS of sterling, civil war memorabilia, linens and artwork, to vintage jewelry, mid-century furniture and decorative items — you name it.

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There is a fellow there from North Carolina who always has the most gorgeous preserved botanicals, and he arranges them in wonderfully captivating ways.

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Sometimes we go just to see how the dealers stage their booths and get decorating ideas.  Burlap is very big here.  Sometimes it feels like if you just cover it in burlap, it will be more attractive.

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This booth is a favorite, she always does a great display of both the old and the new.

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You can also find lots of junk at Scott’s.  But then again, someone else’s junk can truly be someone else’s treasure, right?

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Inez has beautiful furniture that she imports from France — I’ve had my eye on this table for a long time.  You just don’t see marble that color any more.
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These architectural elements had been turned into sconces — I wanted them but not at $650 for the pair.
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And you know I have a thing for urns, this one was saying “take me home!” until I asked the price — $795!
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I couldn’t believe it when I walked up on this glass cloche and base, just like the ones I just saw in I Provence that held wedding crowns.  Loved the way these old books are displayed in it.  Thought about taking it home until again I asked the price — $595.  Cheaper for me to go back to Provence to the brocante!
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For some reason I keep eyeing this iron horse head base that has been turned into a lamp.  Have no idea where I would put it but I think it makes a statement, don’t you?

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And at the end of the day, I bought a $5 glass pitcher for the beautiful silver tablespoons that I brought back from Provence.  Now they can stay out on the kitchen counter where I will see them and use them every day, and every time be reminded of the brocantes that I can’t wait to revisit, and where treasure after treasure awaits.

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6 thoughts on “An “American” Brocante

  1. I so enjoy reading you blog. Keep it coming. Made my day to see this new one, especially looking at so many beautiful things on this sad awful day.

    Sent from my iPad

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    1. Thanks Lynn! Yes, the sadness around the world can be paralyzing. I wrote this entry before I had even learned about the Orlando shootings. We have to keep surrounding ourselves with beauty and the things and people we love to overshadow the bad things when they happen!

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  2. “Sometimes it feels like if you just cover it in burlap, it will be more attractive.”
    Very good fashion advice, Mom! I’ll try it out on my rear end.

    “But then again, someone else’s junk can truly be someone else’s treasure, right?”
    Very good dating advice, Mom! I find that I have to agree—you’ve met Shaun.

    Love you
    Morgan

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